In Said the Shotgun to the Head by Saul Williams, Williams offers debatable views on styles such as governmental policies, religion, battle and feminism, through the sight of a person who has recently been driven to madness following experiencing a passionate kiss. He particularly criticizes Western principles, and the Christian view of any traditional male God. In section 7, Saul Williams makes a lots of references to feminism, as well as the wrongful worshipping of a men God. Additionally, there are a lot of connotations of war and violence. Williams offers a critique of Christianity, one of the most prominent religious beliefs in the Western world. His dislike for the traditional Goodness is a theme throughout the composition, often suggesting that a woman deity ought to be worshipped, as well as the " Wonderful Mother" can eventually break through and take control. Towards the start of section several, Williams questions " wherever is that words from nowhere", in reference to the regular Christian Goodness. He later talks about the " crash of buildings" and the " shriek of sirens". The onomatopoeic word " crash" creates associations of damage, in reference to war, and perhaps especially the 9/11 attack on the twin systems. At first presence, it would seem that Williams is usually accusing the West of forgetting the teachings of Jesus, and in turn submitting to crime and war. Yet , he then will go onto question his initial view, together with the rhetorical issue " or is that his mighty words? " taking a chance that The almighty himself is in charge of the violence and conflict. The qualificative " angry" is used to explain the Christian God, which conflicts with all the traditional look at of a supportive, forgiving God. Furthermore, God is labeled with the personal pronoun " your", which in turn Williams uses to separate himself from the religion he is criticising. A biblical reference to Jesus and the Virgin Mary can be used, as Williams talks of " a virgin generation's son degenerate", and that Our god is " craving" his sacrifice. Christ once perished for our sins, now God wishes another sacrifice. In...